The two people fatally struck by a UP Express train Monday evening were a 16-year-old boy and a 14-year-old girl, Toronto police confirmed Tuesday, though it’s still not clear why they were on the tracks.  

“That’s part of the investigation and we won’t be speaking to that at all at this point,” Insp. Keri Fernandes told reporters in an update Tuesday morning.

However she said the train was packed with over 200 passengers at the time and police are appealing to anyone with information about what happened to come forward.

“These incidents are traumatic for both the families of the victims and to the persons involved in the train. So Toronto Police are seeking anybody with information about what happened prior to that to come forth and to contact Traffic Services,” Fernandes said. “But also we want them to be mindful of their own health and if they’re experiencing anything that they need assistance with, to reach out to Toronto Victims Service and make use of their counseling that’s available to these people.”

The teens were struck by a westbound train on the tracks near Weston Road and Eglinton Avenue West at around 10 p.m.

Police received a call about a person struck by a train and two people were pronounced dead at the scene when first responders arrived.

Fernandes said Tuesday that their families have been notified. Police are not releasing their identities or disclosing their exact relationship.

“It is an ongoing investigation. But really the purpose of us being here is to ensure that people remember that no matter when you’re on tracks, it’s a dangerous period of time and we want people to stay away from them,” Fernandes said.

Martin Gallagher, Chief Operating Officer of GO Transit, spoke alongside Fernandes Tuesday and echoed that message.

“Our message is the same message that we always give, which is please we implore people to stay away from live train tracks. This location is between stations. It’s not at the station. Please do not cross open railway lines,” Gallagher said.

He said GO Transit has a “long, large network” where tracks are open in some parts.

“We employ engineering solutions like fencing and different types of plants and foliage that we use to deter people from crossing open lines and tracks,” Gallagher said.

He said the agency also goes into schools and other community spaces to do education around rail safety and partners with Ontario Provincial Police and Toronto police on enforcement.

“So we take this very seriously and we do a lot to deter people from crossing railway lines,” Gallagher said.

Service on the airport train was suspended for the investigation Monday night. Passengers were held on the affected train until police released it and then disembarked at Mount Dennis Station.

Service on the UP Express resumed Tuesday morning.

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